and justice for all...

Over the holidays, I binge-watched the very popular Netflix docu- series, Making a Murderer.

The series details the story of Steven Avery - a man who, after 18 years of wrongful imprisonment, was exonerated and released - only to be arrested two years later for murder.

The series chronicles Steven's second arrest, trial and ultimate conviction.

Wow.

To bear witness to our legal system in action is both fascinating and frightening.

While I came away with more questions than answers, I also came away with an interesting insight; our justice system eerily replicates our interplay with life and the people, places and circumstances that intersect it.

Much like the defense or the prosecution, we gather evidence that supports

our view of life...

our view of people...

our view of circumstances.

In fact, we often gather so much evidence that we create a kind of tunnel vision where we no longer see that there is anotherpossibility.

Anotherviewpoint.

Another truth.

We barricade ourselves behind our evidence.

We dig in our heels.

Secure our blinders until convinced that there is nothing more to see.

We do it with religion.

We do it with politics.

We do it with sex.

We do it with pretty much everything.

And no one is immune from our scrutiny.

Not family.

Not friends.

Not children.

Not spouses.

And certainly not strangers.

And yet, it makes a certain amount of sense to do so...all of this gathering of evidence....

it provides a kind of ordered logic and security to our lives and our identity.

Hold on too tight, however, and it can put us in a corner from which it is very difficult to move let alone breathe.

For in this space there is no room for

conversation...

or

understanding

or

compassion.

There is only room for

argument

and

misunderstanding

and

fear...masked as opinion and buoyed by ego.

In watching this series, I was reminded of how quickly we can lose any semblance of commonsense or fairness or integrity.

We get caught up in winning...

at all cost...

even if it means we forgo our

peace of mind

or

health

or

relationship

or

humanity.

And so, this week I leave you with the very wise words of Rumi, the 13th century mystic poet:

"Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field.

I'll meet you there."

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